CVEN 302

Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction

Instructor

Dr. Scott A. Socolofsky,
Professor

Office

CE/TTI 802B
Office Hours

Course Meeting Times

MW 8:00-8:50
F 8:00 to 10:50 in CVLB 421

Contact

Ph +1-979-845-4517
socolofs@tamu.edu

Numerical simulation by Dr. Lynett of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami.

Syllabus

The following presents the syllabus for Fall 2015.

CVEN 302 Computer Application in Engineering and Construction. (2-2). Credit 3.Application of computers to solution of civil engineering problems using various numerical methods; structured computer programming; mathematical modeling and error analysis; solution of algebraic and differential equations; numerical differentiation and integration; curve-fitting; root-finding. Prerequisites: ENGR 112; MATH 308 or registration therein; admitted to major degree sequence in civil engineering.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to design and execute computer programming solutions to civil engineering problems using numerical methods.

To achieve this goal, students will learn to:

The course content is organized into five learning modules. The module content and related specific learning outcomes are summarized in the CVEN 302 Learning Modules.

ABET Outcomes

This course also contributes to the following ABET-identified outcomes of the civil engineering curriculum:

Keywords:

Structured computer programming, Matlab, numerical methods, error analysis, root finding, arrays and matrices, regression, interpolation, numerical integration, numerical differentiation, ordinary differential equations, initial value problems, boundary value problems, eigenvalue problems, partial differential equations.

Textbooks

There are two required textbooks for this course

Course Calendar

Please refer to the Calendar page.

Grading

Your final grade for the course will be calculated as follows:

Letter grades will be assigned from your total course score according to 90% to 100%: A, greater than or equal to 80% but <90%: B, greater than or equal to 70% but <80%: C, greater than or equal to 60% but <70%: D, below 60%: F.  Please note that programming assignments are 20% of your grade:  please do not neglect this work!

Problem Sets

Please refer to the Assignments page for a list of all homework assignments.

Problem sets will generally be assigned on a Monday or Wednesday and due within one week. Solutions will be posted the day before assignments are due.

Homework is an important part of the learning process and should be completed individually.  You may ask others for help at places where you have made diligent attempts and have become stumped.  You may ask others for confirmation of results at significant milestones in the problem.  You may not share computer programs, Word documents, or Excel files.  Copying another student’s solution, even if you slightly change the presentation will be considered as cheating and given a grade of zero (see Plagiarism statement below). Referring to posted homework solutions is acceptable as long as the work you turn in is your own.

Homework problems must be answered clearly, showing all your work, and should be easy to follow.  Where applicable, the solution to each problem should contain:

Failure to include one of these elements will result in lost credit for the problem.  Not all homework problems may be graded

Unless you have a university excuse (see Absences below), late assignments will not be accepted for credit.  Please do not ask for exceptions.  Your problem sets grade will be calculated as the average of your top ten scores on the twelve assigned problem sets.

Class Participation and Quizzes

You are expected to attend all classes, turn in all assignments, and complete all exams at their scheduled times.  Exceptions are only permitted for university excused absences (see Absences below). 

Classes will start on time, and pointers for the homework assignments and last-minute changes to the schedule may be announced in class.  It is your responsibility to be in class to receive this information or to get the information from another student.

Quizzes may be given on Fridays and would feature one of the problems from the past week’s homework assignment.  Quizzes are closed book and notes.  Your quiz grade is factored with your grade for problem sets and count as half a problem set each. All quizzes will be included in the quizz grade. Because the quizzes test the homework material, timely completion of homework and attendance are essential to success in this class.

Programming Assignments

Please refer to the Assignments page for a list of all programming assignments.

Programming assignments will generally be assigned each Wednescay and due the following Friday.

Programming assignments are a significant part of your grade: you should complete all assignments, putting forward your best effort, and cheating will not be tolerated. All programming assingments and their related reports will be submitted through Turnitin.com and tested for plagiarism or copying.

Students may choose to complete programming assignments individually or in groups of no more than two students. The assignment must clearly state on the first page the names and UINs of each student who participated in the assignment, and each student will be responsible to turn a copy of the assignment in through their account on Turnitin.com (e.g., if two students work together, they must both submit a copy of the assignment through the website).

As with the homework assignments, you may ask others for help at places where you have made diligent attempts and have become stumped.  You may ask others for confirmation of results at significant milestones in the problem.  You may not share computer programs, Word documents, or Excel files.  Copying another student’s solution, even if you slightly change the presentation will be considered as cheating and given a grade of zero (see Plagiarism statement below).

Each programming assignment will specify a format for reporting the results, but will generally consist of a short written memorandum followed by a program listing, code validation calculations, and complete program output.

Similarly to the homework, unless you have a university excuse (see Absences below), late assignments will not be accepted for credit.  Please do not ask for exceptions.  Your programming grade will be calculated as the average of your top eight scores on the nine assigned programming assignments. In addition, each assignment will feature a challenge problem, worth 30 extra points out of 100, and due at the same time as the assigned program; you may submit three challenge problems for points per semester. It is not necessary to complete any of the challenge problems, and they should not be attempted until the assigned problem is completed satisfactorily.

Exams

Two 110-minute midterm exams and one 2-hr final exam are scheduled (see Course Calendar above for scheduling).  The grading of the exams will be based on both the approach and the final answer.  Exams will be closed book and closed notes.  You may prepare a crytp sheet on the front and back of one page of 8 ½ x 11 paper for each exam.  You will need a hand-held calculator for each exam.  It is your responsibility to ensure that your calculator is working and will perform in the examinations.

Plagiarism and Cheating

"An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal, or tolerate those who do." Students are expected to understand and abide by the Aggie Honor Code presented on the web at:

No form of scholastic misconduct will be tolerated. Academic misconduct includes cheating, fabrication, falsification, multiple submissions, plagiarism, complicity, etc. These are more fully defined in the above web site. As commonly defined, plagiarism consists of passing off as one's own the ideas, words, writings, etc., which belong to another. In accordance with this definition, you are committing plagiarism if you copy the work of another person and turn it in as your own, even if you should have permission of that person. Since the problem sets and programming assignments grade for this course is a high percentage of your total grade, no plagiarism or cheating will be permitted in these assignments. Violations will be handled in accordance with the Aggie Honor System Process described on the web site.

Absences

The university views class attendance as an individual student responsibility. Students are expected to attend class and to complete all assignments. Instructors are expected to give adequate notice of the dates on which major tests will be given and assignments will be due. For more details, please read Part I, Rule 7 of the Texas A&M University Student Rules at

Please contact me as soon as you know you will miss a class or an exam so that a reasonable alternative can be accommodated. Unexcused absences will result in a grade of zero for the missed work. The instructor is under no obligation to provide an opportunity for the student to make up work missed because of an unexcused absence.

ABET

Students may be asked to allow copies of their assignments and exams to be submitted to the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) review panel. The purpose of this is to demonstrate to ABET that our stated mission and objectives are being effectively implemented. Your grade will not be affected by participation.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civi lrights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact Disability Services, in Cain Hall, Room B118, or call 845-1637. For additional information visit http://disability.tamu.edu.

Export Controls

All information included in the public areas of the course website is paraphrased from the course textbooks, which are public domain and publically available. All of the programming and numerical methods covered in this course are listed in the course catalog and are public domain. The online videos are protected and only available to students enrolled in the course; none of the material in the videos is export controlled, but this precaution prevents the unintended export of instructional material to an embargoed country.